The Iowa Senate passes the education bill, and it’s now up to the Iowa House

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Iowa Senate lawmakers passed a controversial broad-based education bill after debate on Wednesday. It now returns to the Iowa House. F 496 could bring about some major changes if passed by the House and signed into law. The law prohibits school districts from giving any instruction regarding gender identity and sexual orientation in public elementary schools. Under the bill, districts would also not be able to “knowingly provide false or misleading information” to parents about their children’s gender identity. If a child wants to use a new name or pronoun at school that differs from their school record, officials will need to notify parents. The bill also requires school libraries and classrooms to remove any books describing or showing sexual acts. Democrats say the bill could cause people to leave the state. “It’s targeted,” said Sen. Molly Donahue of Cedar Rapids. “It does not protect all children. It only promotes excessive censorship, which is a dangerous path for us in the nation to take.” However, Republicans argue that the bill is about parental choice. “The bill here does not attack children. That is not the intent of the bill,” said Republican Senator Brad Zohn, who represents Urbandale. “This law here allows fathers to be fathers. We are trying to protect the children.” Previously, the Iowa Senate passed a version of the governor’s education bill in March. Then he went to the Iowa House, which amended and passed the law in early April. Then the bill returned to the Senate, where amendments were made to it. Then pass the bill in its current form. Now back to the Iowa House.

Iowa Senate lawmakers passed a controversial broad-based education bill after debate on Wednesday. Now back to the Iowa House.

SF496 It could bring about some major changes if the House of Representatives passes it and signs it into law.

The bill would prohibit school districts from giving any instruction regarding gender identity and sexual orientation in public elementary schools.

Under the bill, districts would also not be able to “knowingly provide false or misleading information” to parents about their children’s gender identity. If a child wants to use a new name or pronoun at school that differs from their school record, officials will need to notify parents.

The bill also requires school libraries and classrooms to remove any books describing or showing sexual acts.

Democrats say the bill could cause people to leave the state.

“He’s on target,” said Sen. Molly Donahue of Cedar Rapids. “It does not protect all children. It only promotes excessive censorship, which is a dangerous path for us in the nation to take.”

However, Republicans argue that the bill is about parental choice.

“The bill here does not attack children. That is not the intent of the bill,” said Republican Senator Brad Zohn, who represents Urbandale. “This law here allows fathers to be fathers. We are trying to protect the children.”

Previously, the Iowa Senate passed a version of the governor’s education bill in March. Then he went to the Iowa House, which amended and passed the law in early April. Then the bill returned to the Senate, where amendments were made to it. Then pass the bill in its current form. Now back to the Iowa House.